Worth Your Weight

October 9, 2009

The cure for obesity

Filed under: fat acceptance — worthyourweight @ 8:15 pm

My aunt (the one who had WLS) once told me she believed I could find the cure for obesity. She meant it as high praise. She was telling me she thought I could accomplish anything, and the pinnacle in her eyes was curing obesity.

But I was beaten to the punch. One of the basic tenets of fat acceptance is that fat is not a disease. In fact, “obesity” is a misnomer because it medicalizes the state of being fat, which FA believes is a natural one. I find it an ugly sounding word. It’s even uglier if you believe fat is but one variation of body size and not something you’ve done to yourself because you’re a bad, bad girl. In fact, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word derives from the Latin obesus meaning “that has eaten itself fat.”

So I guess GlaxoSmithKline can eat FA’s dust.

All cured!

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. Side effects include believing in your own worth and a reduction in stress.

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6 Comments

  1. You raise a very interesting point, that ties to what I’ve felt for a long time, and that is maybe we should apply our knowledge and intelligence to the area of weigth, certainly those in a position to, don’t appear to be. And why should they be able to get away with that?

    That might sound contrary to FA, but I don’t see why it should be.

    Finding out how to change or reset our metabolism in an upward or downward direction seems to me not only to be perfectly legitimate, but really interesting. And natural, the body itself does it, it has to.

    The potential ramifications of bringing this under some kind of conscious control are formidable and go far beyond mere weight.

    If we could reset or change weight, naturally and with ease, we could either use that same model/pattern in other areas, the knowledge itself could itself provide other leads and so on.

    I just can’t accept that we have to let the abominations that are weight loss dieting and ‘obesity science’, put us off learning more about how our bodies work, it seems to me, that’s what they really exist for.

    Comment by wriggles — October 10, 2009 @ 9:42 am

  2. I get what you’re saying, wriggles, because in my weaker moments when I hate myself for being fat, I think there must be a way to convince the body to increase one’s metabolism just as it’s decreased during a starvation diet. Set point theory does posit that one can decrease one’s weight to the lower end of the set point — probably only 20 pounds. Unfortunately, it would take pushing the set point down 50 or 100 pounds in order to fit some of us fats into a socially acceptable range. (Oh, and apparently it’s still a Herculean effort to even push one’s weight to the lower end of set point.)

    So I don’t know. The point I was trying to make is that if fat is a natural variation like short/tall and different hair/eye colors, then “obesity” doesn’t exist. In fact, I would think the only thing that comes close to “obesity” is dieting your way above your set point, i.e. “that has dieted itself fat.”

    This may sound naive, but if we trust how bodies work, I think it’s very telling that set point seems to only be able to be reset in an upward direction. And if that’s caused by starving, then an overly simple theory to try resetting set point downwards would be overeating, right? But overeating doesn’t cause a lowered set point.

    Comment by worthyourweight — October 10, 2009 @ 3:09 pm

  3. I was going to say at the beginning of that response, that I also don’t see fatness as disease. I don’t see being underweight(also natural) as a disease either but I can see how being able to keep weight up, can help preserve life enough to save it.

    I did get what you aunt was saying, but what I thought was ironic was from a different angle, the idea has occured to me. Why shouldn’t we consider how to change weight/manipulate our metabolism, through some model other than that of starvation?

    That would so shame the useless obesity science field the thought is too delicious.

    This may sound naive, but if we trust how bodies work, I think it’s very telling that set point seems to only be able to be reset in an upward direction.

    Our knowledge is incomplete, it’s impossible to believe that weight can only be reset upward. Surely that would be unprecidented in science? A force that only goes one way?

    As for weight loss being intrinsically painful, it isn’t, dieting is though and that’s the key for me. Ditto weight gain, it is rarely painful in itself, so theoretically, there must be a way of shedding weight, that isn’t painful, we just don’t know what it is. And they don’t seem to be looking for it, they’re more looking for pills, because they won’t be satisfied until we are all junkies, for obvious reasons.

    Dieting is a form of weight loss, so is the daily fluctuations that occur as our body’s supply us energy throughout the day, so is the indirect weight loss that occurs as a result of another change, positive or negative, in your life.

    I don’t hate myself for being fat either, I really do believe FA’s for everyone. But at the risk of alienating people, I just can’t abandon those people at the top of the scale to their fate. They didn’t ask to be there anymore than I asked not to, so what’s for them? Nothing, certainly not ‘obesity science’, if we don’t help, who else is going to?

    Comment by wriggles — October 12, 2009 @ 4:37 am

  4. wriggles:
    “Our knowledge is incomplete, it’s impossible to believe that weight can only be reset upward. Surely that would be unprecidented in science? A force that only goes one way?”

    Well, the only (again admittedly naive) theory I’ve come up with is that weight loss is not a biological plus as weight gain can be. Storing fat is an effort to guard against starvation. I can’t imagine a purely biological benefit to weight loss. AFAICR, any physical advantage attributed to weight loss can actually be achieved through moderate exercise, regardless of weight loss (such as reducing blood sugar levels, bringing down blood pressure).

    When you talk of people at the top end of the scale, do you mean those that are disgustingly referred to as “super obese”? Because I have another theory about that :) I don’t think they are just really, really fat. I think they have a genetic disorder that caused their metabolism to break even worse than, say, an inbetweenie’s did because of dieting. I remember reading that many (or was it all?) extremely fat people had been put on diets as infants or toddlers. So maybe it’s not a genetic disorder but rather messing with a kid’s metabolism in a crucial stage of development.

    Comment by worthyourweight — October 12, 2009 @ 2:52 pm

  5. “Side effects include believing in your own worth and a reduction in stress.” <– LOVE IT! right on!

    Comment by Ali — October 12, 2009 @ 6:36 pm

  6. Thanks, Ali!

    Comment by worthyourweight — October 12, 2009 @ 7:26 pm


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